Web Theoi
KARYSTOS
 
Greek Name Transliteration Latin Spelling Translation
Καρυστος Karystos Carystus Herald (karyssô)

KARYSTOS (or Carystus) was a rustic demi-god native to the island of Euboia in central Greece. In the local mythology he was the father of the shepherd-god Aristaios, foster-father of Dionysos. He also gave his name to the southern Euboian town of Karystos.

PARENTS
KHEIRON & KHARIKLO (Scholiast on Pindar's Pythian 4.181; Eustathius on Homer 281)
OFFSPRING
ARISTAIOS (Bacchylides Frag 45)

ENCYCLOPEDIA

CARYSTUS (Karustos), a son of Cheiron and Chariclo, from whom the town of Carystus in Euboea was believed to have derived its name. (Schol. ad Pind. Pyth. iv. 181; Eustath. ad Hom. p. 281.)

Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.


Bacchylides, Fragment 45 (from Scholiast on Apollonius of Rhodes) (trans. Campbell, Vol. Greek Lyric IV) (Greek lyric C5th B.C.) :
"Some authorities give the parentage of four gods called Aristaios (Aristaeus), as Bakkhylides does : one the son of Karystos (Carystus), another the son of Khiron (Chiron), another the son of Ge (Earth) and Ouranos (Sky), and the son of Kyrene (Cyrene)."


NOTES:
In Bacchylides' description, there appear to be two Aristaioses--the first and third are the Euboian Titan-god [i.e. Hesiod's Astraios], the second and fourth are the Thessalian rustic-god [i.e. the god usually described as a son of Apollon].
Karystos may have been identified with the Euboian demi-god Sokos father of the Euboian Korybantes (whose number included the Aristaios-like Kourete Melisseus). He may also have been associated with the Titan Krios (literally the "Ram"), father of the Aristaios-like Titan Astraios. Forms of the words sokos-karystos-krios were all used as epithets of Hermes--"the strong one," "the herald," "the ram-"bearer. Karystos, literally "the herald", might be the Euboian Hermes.


Sources:

  • Greek Lyric IV Bacchylides, Fragments - Greek Lyric C5th B.C.

Other references not currently quoted here: Eustathius on Homer's Iliad 281; Scholiast on Pindar's Pythian 4.181