Web Theoi
METOPE
 
Greek Name Transliteration Latin Spelling Translation
Μετωπη Metôpê Metope Space-Between-
the-Eyes (metôpon)

METOPE was the Naiad nymph of the springs and stream of Metope near the town of Stymphalos in Arkadia (southern Greece).

Her waters may have been regarded as the source of the Arkadian river Ladon and the Sikyonian Asopos, the streams of her father and husband respectively.

PARENTS
[1.1] LADON (Apollodorus 3.156, Diodorus Siculus 4.72.1)
OFFSPRING

[1.1] THEBE (by Asopos) (Pindar Olympian Ode 6)
[1.2] AIGINA, SALAMIS, THEBE, KORKYRA, PLATAIA, TANAGRA, THESPIA, EUBOIA, SINOPE (by Asopos) (Corinna Frag 654)
[1.3] ISMENOS, PELEGON, AIGINA, SALAMIS, ISMENE, 17x OTHER DAUGHTERS (by Asopos) (Apollodorus 2.5, 3.156 -161)
[1.4] ISMENOS, PELASGOS, AIGINA, SALAMIS, THEBE, KORKYRA, TANAGRA, THESPEIA, KLEONE, HARPINE, SINOPE, PEIRENE, ASOPIS, ORNIA, KHALKIS (by Asopos) (Diodorus Siculus 4.72.1)

ENCYCLOPEDIA

METO′PE (Metôpê). A daughter of the Arcadian river-god Ladon, was married to Asopus, and the mother of Thebe. (Apollod. iii. 12. § 6; Pind. Ol. vi. 144, with the Schol.)

Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.


Pindar, Olympian Ode 6. 83 ff (trans. Conway) (Greek lyric C5th B.C.) :
"From Stymphalos [in Arkadia] my mother's mother came, that maid of flowers, Metope, who bore Thebe, famous rider of horse. Her lovely waters shall I drink to honour famous men of arms."

Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 3. 156 (trans. Aldrich) (Greek mythographer C2nd A.D.) :
"Metope, herself a daughter of the river Ladon, married him [the River Asopos] and bore two sons, Ismenos and Pelagon, and twenty daughters, of whom Zeus kidnapped one named Aigina."

Diodorus Siculus, Library of History 4. 72. 1 (trans. Oldfather) (Greek historian C1st B.C.) :
"Asopos made his home in Phlios [the land of Sicyon], where he married Metope, the daughter of Ladon, to whom were born two sons, Pelasgos and Ismenos, and twelve daughters, Korkyra and Salamis, also Aigina, Peirene, and Kleone, then Thebe, Tanagra, Thespeia, and Asopis, also Sinope, and finally Ornia and Khalkis."

Aelian, Historical Miscellany 2. 33 (trans. Wilson) (Greek rhetorician C2nd to 3rd A.D.) :
"The nature of rivers, and their streams, are visible to us. But men who honour them, and have statues made of them, in some cases set up anthropomorphic statues, while others give them bovine form. A likeness to cattle is attributed by the Stymphalians to Erasinos and Metope."


Sources:

  • Pindar, Odes - Greek Lyric C5th B.C.
  • Apollodorus, The Library - Greek Mythography C2nd A.D.
  • Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History - Greek History C1st B.C.
  • Aelian, Historical Miscellany - Greek Rhetoric C2nd-3rd A.D.