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ARTEMIS RETINUE
 
Greek Name Transliteration Latin Spelling Latin Name
Αρτεμις Artemis Artemis Diana
OTHER ARTEMIS PAGES
Artemis Intro, Index & Gallery
Artemis Goddess of
Artemis Myths 1, Part 2
Artemis Wrath 1, Part 2, Part 3
Artemis Favour
Artemis Estate & Attributes
Artemis Cult 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
Artemis Titles & Epithets
Artemis Summary

ARTEMIS was the great Olympian goddess of hunting, wild animals, children and childbirth.

This page catalogues the large retinue of the goddess: her attendant band of Nymphs and mortal maidens.

The most famous of these in myth were the three Hyperborean maids, Oupis, Hekaerge and Loxo; and mortal girls like Kallisto and Prokris.

She also had a pair of famous male companions: the Giant Orion and the boy Hippolytos.


(1) ATTENDANTS MAIDEN NYMPHAI
AMNISIADES, THE The twenty Naias Nymphe daughters of the River-God Amninos (in Krete) formed the core retinue of Artemis, along with sixty of the Okeanides.
OKEANIDES, THE Sixty (of the three thousand) Okeanides formed the core of the retinue of Artemis, along with twenty of the Naiades Amnisiades. They were all nine years old in observed appearance.
NYMPHAI, GENERAL Nymphai of many realms joined the company of Artemis as she travelled from land to land.
NYMPHAI, BIRD Bird-legged Nymphai attended the Stymphalian shrine of Artemis in Arkadia (Southern Greece).
(2) ATTENDANTS APOTHEOSED MAIDENS
ASPALIS A girl of Phthiotis (in Northern Greece) who was granted immortality by Artemis after her death. She became the protecting temple spirit of the goddess' shrine in Phthian Melite.
BRITOMARTIS A girl of Krete (in the Greek Aegean) who became an immortal companion of Artemis after she leapt into the sea whilst fleeing from the lustful pursuit of King Minos.
HEKAERGE, LOXO & OUPIS Three Hyperborean maidens (of the mythical northern land) who became immortal companions of Artemis after their death on the island of Delos. They tended the goddess' shrine on the island of Delos.
IPHIGENEIA A Princess of Mykenai (in Southern Greece) whom Artemis made immortal after she was offered up to the goddess as sacrifice.
MAKARIA-EUKLEIA A Lady of Thebes or Attika (in Central-Southern Greece) whom Artemis made immortal after she sacrificed herself for her family.
PARTHENOS & HEMITHEA Two princesses of the island of Naxos (in the Greek Aegean), who were granted immortality by Apollon. They became companions of the goddess Artemis.
PHYLONOE A princess of Lakedaimonia (in Southern Greece) who was made immortal by Artemis. She was related to, if not the same as, Polyboia below.
POLYBOIA A princess of Lakedaimonia (in Southern Greece) who was made immortal by Artemis. She was related to, if not the same as, Phylonoe above.
(3) ATTENDANTS APOTHEOSED YOUTHS
HIPPOLYTOS A Prince of Troizenos in the Argolis (Southern Greece), who was a friend and companion of the goddess Artemis. He was slain through the machinations of Aphrodite, brought to life again by Asklepios, and carried off by Artemis to be the immortal attendant of her Arician shrine (in Italy).
(4) COMPANIONS GODS & GODDESSES
APOLLON Artemis' twin brother was one of her closest companions. The pair are usually depicted together in scenes of the gods.
ATHENA The goddess Athena was raised alongside Artemis, Persephone, and the maiden Okeanides. She was not usually associated with Artemis beyond the Persephone story.
LETO The Titanis mother of Artemis was a close companion of her daughter.
MOUSAI, THE The nine Mousai were primarily attendants of Apollon, but they also occassionally accompanied Artemis in her maiden dance and song (especially during the feasts of Olympos).
PERSEPHONE The spring-time goddess was a companion of Artemis before her abduction to the underworld by Haides. Some say Artemis became Khthonian Hekate, and the pair remained companions above and below the earth.
(5) FORMER COMPANIONS NYMPHAI
ARETHOUSA An Arkadian Naias Nymphe (Southern Greece) who was a companion of Artemis before her transformation into the sacred spring of Artemis' Syrakousan shrine (in Sicily).
AURA The Titanis goddess of the breeze was a close companion of Artemis until she offended the goddess and was punished with the forced loss of her virginity.
BEROE The Goddess of Phoinikian Beruit (in Western Asia) hunted with Artemis in her maiden years before her marriage to Poseidon.
NIKAIA A Phrygian Nymphe (Asia Minor) who accompanied Artemis in the hunt, until she was raped by Dionysos.
PHOLOE A Latin Nymphe (Central Italy) who was a one-time companion of Artemis, before her transformation into a spring.
SYRINX An Arkadian Nymphe (Southern Greece) who was a one-time companion of Artemis, before her transformation into river-reeds.
TAYGETE A Lakedaimonian Nymphe (Southern Greece) of the Taygetos Mountains. She was a companion of Artemis before her seduction by Zeus.
(6) FORMER COMPANIONS MORTAL MAIDENS
ANTIKLEIA A Princess of Phokis (in Central Greece) who later became the wife of Laertes and mother of Odysseus. In her youth she was a companion of Artemis.
ATALANTA A Princess of Skhoinea in Boiotia (Central Greece) who accompanied Artemis in the hunt, before her marriage to Melanion.
KALLISTO A Princess of Arkadia (in Southern Greece) who was a hunting companion of Artemis before her violation at the hands of Zeus.
KYRENE A huntress Nymphe or Princess of Thessalia (in Northern Greece) who was a companion of Artemis, before her seduction by Apollon.
PHYLONOME A Princess of Arkadia (in Southern Greece) who was wont to hunt with Artemis, before being seduced by the god Ares.
PROKRIS A Lady of Attika (in Southern Greece) who hunted in company with Artemis before her marriage to Kephalos.
(7) FORMER COMPANIONS MORTAL YOUTHS
HIPPOLYTOS A Prince of Troizenos in the Argolis (Southern Greece) who hunted with Artemis prior to his youthful death.
ORION A Giant Prince of Hyria in Boiotia (Central Greece) who hunted with Artemis throughout the islands of the Greek Aegean before his untimely death by scorpion sting.

SACRED BAND OF VIRGINS (GENERAL)

Artemis was the goddess protector of maidens (pre-marital, virgin girls). All maidens were figuratively speaking her companions, and performed ritual dances in her honour. By extension, all the maiden nymphai were her literal companions, as well as certain favoured heroines of myth.

Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 184 ff (trans. Mair) (Greek poet C3rd B.C.) :
"Which of the Nymphai dost thou love above the rest, and what heroines hast thou taken for thy companions? Say, goddess, thou to me, and I will sing thy saying to others . . . Beyond others thou lovest the Nymphe of Gortyn, Britomartis, slayer of stags, the goodly archer . . . Yea and Kyrene thou madest thy comrade, to whom on a time thyself didst give two hunting dogs, with whom the maiden daughter of Hypseus beside the Iolkian tomb won the prize. And the fair-haired [Prokris] wife of Kephalos, son of Deioneus, O Lady, thou madest thy fellow in the chase and fair Antikleia [mother of Odysseus], they say, thou dist love even as thine own eyes. These were the first who wore the gallant bow and arrow-holding quivers on their shoulders; their right shoulders bore the quiver strap, and always the right breast showed bare. Further thou dist greatly commend swift-footed Atalanta, the slayer of boars, daughter of Arkadian Iasios, and taught her hunting with dogs and good archery."

Ovid, Fasti 2. 155 ff (trans.Boyle) (Roman poetry C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.) :
"She [the mortal girl Kallisto] touched the goddess' bow: ‘this bow I touch,’ she cried, ‘Be a witness to my virginity.’ Cynthia [Artemis] praised her, and said: ‘Keep the pledge you vowed and you will be my companions' princeps.’ "


ARTEMIS ATTENDANTS: BAND OF NYMPHAI

Homer, Odyssey 6. 102 ff (trans. Shewring) (Greek epic C8th B.C.) :
"Artemis far-shooting (iokheaira) ranges the mountainside - on lofty Taygetos, it may be, or it may be on Erymanthos - taking her pleasure among the boars and the running deer; Nymphai of the countryside (agronomoi), daughters of Zeus who holds the aigis, are all around her and share her pastime; Leto her mother is glad at heart. With head and forehead Artemis overtops the rest, and though all are lovely, there is no mistaking which is she."

Homeric Hymn 2 to Demeter 415 ff (trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C7th or 6th B.C.) :
"[Persephone tells Demeter of her abduction by Haides:] ‘All we were playing in a lovely meadow, Leukippe and Phaino and Elektra and Ianthe [and various other maiden Nymphai Okeanides] . . . with Pallas [Athena] who rouses battles and Artemis delighting-in-arrows (iokheaira): we were playing and gathering sweet flowers in our hands, soft crocuses mingled with irises and hyacinths, and rose-blooms and lilies, marvellous to see.’ "

Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1. 1225 ff (trans. Rieu) (Greek epic C3rd B.C.) :
"The Nymphai [of Kios in Mysia] were about to hold their dances - it was the custom of all those who haunt the beautiful headland to sing the praise of Artemis by night. The Nymphai of the mountain peaks and caverns were all posted some way off to patrol the woods."

Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 3. 879 ff :
"Artemis, standing in her golden chariot after she has bathed in the gently water of Parthenios or the streams of Amnisos, and driving off with her fast-trotting deer over the hills and far away to some rich-scented sacrifice. Attendant Nymphai have gathered at the source of Amnisos or flocked in from the glens and upland springs to follow her; and fawning beasts whimper in homage and tremble as she passes by."

Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 12 ff (trans. Mair) (Greek poet C3rd B.C.) :
"[Artemis to her father Zeus:] ‘And give me sixty daughters of Okeanos (Okeanines) for my choir - all nine years old, all maidens yet ungirdled; and give me for handmaidens twenty Nymphai of Amnisos (Amnisides) who shall tend well my buskins, and, when I shoot no more at lynx or stag, shall tend my swift hounds.’ "

Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 40 ff :
"And the maiden [Artemis] fared unto the white moutain of Krete leafy with woods; thence unto Okeanos; and she chose many Nymphai all nine years old, all maidens yet ungirdled. And the River Kairatos was glad exceedingly, and glad was Tethys that they were sending their daughters to be handmaidens to the daughter of Leto."

Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 170 ff :
"For thee [Artemis] the Amnisiades rub down the hinds [the golden horned deer that draw the chariot of Artemis] loosed from the yoke, and from the mead of Hera they gather and carry for them to feed on much swift-springing clover, which also the horses of Zeus eat; and golden troughs they fill with water to be for the deer a pleasant draught . . . But when the Nymphai encircle thee in the dance, near the springs of Aigyptian Inopos or Pitane - for Pitane too is thine - or in Limnai or where, goddess, thou camest from Skythia to dwell, in Alai . . . for the god Helios never passes by that beauteous dance, but stays his car to gaze upon the sight, and lights of day are lengthened."

Pausanias, Description of Greece 6. 22. 8 (trans. Jones) (Greek travelogue C2nd A.D.) :
"Artemis was holding at Letrinoi [in Elis] an all-night revel with the Nymphai who were her playmates, and to it came Alpheios. But Artemis had a suspicion of the plot of Alpheios [to rape her], and smeared with mud her own face and the faces of the Nymphai with her. So Alpheios, when he joined the throng, could not distinguish Artemis from the others, and, not being able to pick her out, went away without bringing off his attempt."

Ovid, Metamorphoses 2. 414 ff (trans. Melville) (Roman epic C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.) :
"Dictynna [Artemis] across high Maenalus progressing with her troop, proud of her kills, observed the girl [Kallisto] and called her [join the group] . . . Diana [Artemis], wearied by her brother’s beams and by the chase, reached a cool shady grove, through which there flowed a babbling rivulet, whose gliding current shaped its shelving sands. Charmed by the place, the goddess dipped her feet into the stream; and that was charming too. ‘No spy is near,’ she said, ‘here let us strip and bathe.’ "

Ovid, Metamorphoses 3. 138 ff :
"There was a valley clothed in hanging woods of pine and cypress, named Gargaphie, sacred to chaste Diana [Artemis], huntress queen . . . Here, tired after the hunt, the goddess loved her Nymphae to bathe her with the water's balm. Reaching the cave, she gave her spear and quiver and bow unstrung to an attendant Nympha; others received her robes over their arms; two loosed her sandals; more expert than these Crocale (Sea-Shore) tied the hair loose on her shoulders into a knot, her own hair falling free. Then Nephele (Cloud) and Hyale (Crystal) and Rhanis (Rain-Drop) and Phiale (Water-Pitcher) and Psecas (Rain-Shower) brought the water in brimming jars and poured it over her. And while Titania [Artemis] bathed there in the pool . . . it chanced [Aktaion] . . . the day’s hunt finished, idly wandering through unknown clearings of the forest, found the sacred grove . . . At once, seeing a man, all naked as they were, the Nymphae, beating their breasts, filled the whole grove with sudden screams and clustered round Diana [Artemis] to clothe her body with their own."

Ovid, Metamorphoses 4. 302 ff :
"[Near] the towns of Lycia . . . and Carae . . . there is a pool, a limpid shining pool, clear to its very bottom . . . A Nympha [Salmakis] dwelt there, not one to bend the bow or join the hunt or run to win the race; she was the only of the Naides unknown to swift Diana [Artemis]. Many a time her sisters chide her: ‘Come, Salmacis, get out your spear or painted quiver; vary your hours of ease with hardships of the chase.’ "

Ovid, Fasti 2. 155 ff :
"The sacred circle of Hamadryades of huntress Diana [Artemis] . . . Phoebe [Artemis] returned from hunting scores of forest beasts, as the sun occupied or passed midday. When she reached the grove (a grove dark with dense ilex, around a deep fountain of cool water), she said, ‘Let's bathe here in the wood . . . ’ She had instructed the Nymphae too. The Nymphae undress."

Virgil, Aeneid 1. 500 ff (trans. Day-Lewis) (Roman epic C1st B.C.) :
"By the banks of Eurotas [in Lakedaimonia, Southern Greece] or over the Cynthian slopes [of the island of Delos] Diana [Artemis] foots the dance, and a thousand Oreades (Mountain-Nymphs) following weave a constellation around that arrowy one, who in grace of movement excels all goddesses."

Statius, Silvae 2. 3. 1 (trans. Mozley) (Roman poetry C1st A.D.) :
"Frightened troops of [Latin] Nymphae were fleeing from Pan . . . With speedy steps Diana [Artemis] approached, as she ranges the seven hills and tracks the flight of a deer on Aventine; the goddess was vexed to see it, and turning to her trusty comrades: ‘Shall I never keep this unseemly, wanton brood from lustful rapine? Must my chaste band of followers ever grow fewer?’ . . . The Nais [Pholoe], Phoebe's [Artemis']."

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 16. 127 ff (trans. Rouse) (Greek epic C5th A.D.) :
"I will give you sixty dancing handmaids, to complete the unnumbered dance that attends you, as many as the servants of the mountain Archeress [Artemis], as many as the daughters of Okeanos; then Artemis hunting will not rival you, even if she be the mistress of the hunt."

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 48. 302 ff :
"[Artemis] and maiden Aura mounted the car [Artemis' chariot], took reins and whip and drove the horned team [of deer] like a tempest. The unveiled daughters of everflowing Okeanos her servants made haste to accompany the Archeress: one moved her swift knees as her queen’s forerunner, another tucked up her tunic and ran level not far off, a third laid a hand on the basket of the swiftmoving car and ran alongside. Archeress diffusing radiance from her face stood shining above her attendants . . . The goddess [Artemis] leapt out of her car [of her chariot]; Oupis took the bow from her shoulders, and Hekaerge the quiver; the daughters of Okeanos took off the well-strung hunting nets, and another took charge of the dogs; Loxo loosed the boots from her feet."

For MORE information on these companion Nymphs see:
OKEANIDES ARTEMISIAI and NYMPHAI AMNISIADES


ARTEMIS ATTENDANTS: BIRD NYMPHAI

Marble statues of bird-legged maidens decorated the temple of Artemis in Arkadian Stymphalos. They were probably regarded as local attendants of Artemis who was the goddess of the bird- and fish-rich Stymphalian lake.

Pausanias, Description of Greece 8. 22. 4 (trans. Jones) (Greek travelogue C2nd A.D.) :
"In Stymphalos [Arkadia] there is also an old sanctuary of Stymphalian Artemis . . . Near the roof of the temple have been carved, among other things, the Stymphalian birds . . . There are here also maidens of white marble, with the legs of birds, and they stand behind the temple."


ARTEMIS ATTENDANTS: BRITOMARTIS

Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 184 ff (trans. Mair) (Greek poet C3rd B.C.) :
"Which of the Nymphai dost thou [Artemis] love above the rest . . . Beyond others thou lovest the Nymphe of Gortyn, Britomartis, slayer of stags, the goodly archer."

Diodorus Siculus, Library of History 5. 76. 3 (trans. Oldfather) (Greek historian C1st B.C.) :
"Britomartis, who is also called Diktynna, the myths relate, was born at Kaino in Krete of Zeus and Karme . . . she invented the nets (diktya) which are used in hunting, whence she has been called Diktynna, and she passed her time in the company of Artemis."

For MYTHS of Artemis and Britomartis see Artemis Favour: Britomartis
For MORE information on this goddess see BRITOMARTIS


ARTEMIS ATTENDANTS: OUPIS, LOXO, HEKAERGE

Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 1. 27 (trans. Aldrich) (Greek mythographer C2nd A.D.) :
"Artemis shot him [the Giant Orion] as he was forcing his attention on Oupis, a virgin who had come [to the island of Delos] from the Hyperboreoi (Hyperboreans)."

Herodotus, Histories 4. 35. 1 (trans. Godley) (Greek historian C5th B.C.) :
"The Delians relate that two virgins, Arge and Opis, came from the Hyperboreans . . . to Delos . . . Arge and Opis, they say, came with the gods themselves [Apollon and Artemis], and received honors of their own from the Delians."

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 5. 480 ff (trans. Rouse) (Greek epic C5th A.D.) :
"I [Aktaion] climbed a tree to look on the Archeress's [Artemis'] body with bold eyes [while she was bathing with her Nymphai] . . . The Naiades all shrieked together; Loxo cried aloud with Oupis in concert, and checked her sister Hekaerge who was swimming in the calm stream."

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 48. 302 ff :
"The goddess [Artemis] leapt out of her car [of her chariot]; Oupis took the bow from her shoulders, and Hekaerge the quiver; the daughters of Okeanos took off the well-strung hunting nets, and another took charge of the dogs; Loxo loosed the boots from her feet."

For MYTHS of Artemis & these maidens see Artemis Favour: Oupis, Loxo
For MORE information on these Nymphai see OUPIS, LOXO, HEKAERGE


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: ARETHOUSA

Ovid, Metamorphoses 5. 610 ff (trans. Melville) (Roman epic C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.) :
"[Arethousa prayed to Artemis when the River-god Alpheios was chasing her:] ‘Save thy hunting-nymphe Diana [Artemis] to whom so oft thou gavest thy bow to bear, they arrows and thy quiver!’ "

For MYTHS of Artemis & Arethousa see Artemis Favour: Arethousa
For MORE information on this Nymphe see ARETHOUSA


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: AURA

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 48. 302 ff (trans. Rouse) (Greek epic C5th A.D.) :
"[Artemis] and maiden Aura mounted the car [Artemis' chariot], took reins and whip and drove the horned team [of deer] like a tempest."

For the MYTH of Artemis & Aura see Artemis Wrath: Aura
For MORE information on this goddess see AURA


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: NIKAIA

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 16. 392 ff (trans. Rouse) (Greek epic C5th A.D.) :
"[Nikaia after being raped by Dionysos:] Unwilling she left the ancient beastbreeding forest, being ashamed after that bed to show herself to the Archeress [Artemis]."

For MORE information on this Nymphe see NIKAIA


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: BEROE

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 41. 51 ff (trans. Rouse) (Greek epic C5th A.D.) :
"Beroe [daughter of Aphrodite and Adonis] grew up, and [in her maidenhood] coursed with the Archeress [Artemis], carrying the nets of ther hunter sire [Adonis]."

For MORE information on this goddess Nymphe see BEROE


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: PHOLOE

Statius, Silvae 2. 3. 1 (trans. Mozley) (Roman poetry C1st A.D.) :
"[Artemis saw Pan chasing the nymphe Pholoe and cried]: ‘Shall I never keep this unseemly, wanton brood from lustful rapine? Must my chaste band of followers ever grow fewer?’ . . . The Nais, Phoebe's [Artemis'] votary [escaped when Artemis transformed her into a spring]."

For MYTHS of Artemis & Pholoe see Artemis Favour: Pholoe


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: SYRINX

Ovid, Metamorphoses 1. 689 ff (trans. Melville) (Roman epic C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.) :
"Once there lived on the cold mountainsides of Arcadia a Naias, who among the Hamadryades Nonacrinae (of lofty Nonacris) was the most renowned. Syrinx the Nymphae called her . . . In her pursuits - and in her chastity - Syrinx revered Ortygia [Artemis]; girt like her she well might seem, so easy to mistake, Diana's [Artemis'] self, were not her bow of horn, Latonia's [Artemis'] gold."

For MORE information on this Nymphe see SYRINX


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: TAYGETE

Pindar, Olympian Ode 3 ep2 (trans. Conway) (Greek lyric C5th B.C.) :
"He [Herakles] came from Arkadia’s high peaks and winding glens, by constraint of his father, to perform the bidding of Eurystheus, and bring back the Hind of the Golden Horns [the Kerynitian Hind], which once Taygete had vowed to Orthosia [Artemis], a sacred gift, and on it wrote the sign of consecration."

For MORE information on this Nymphe see TAYGETE


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: ATHENA & PERSEPHONE

Homeric Hymn 2 to Demeter 415 ff (trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C7th or 6th B.C.) :
"[Persephone tells Demeter of her abduction by Haides:] ‘All we were playing in a lovely meadow, Leukippe and Phaino and Elektra and Ianthe [and various other Okeanides] . . . with Pallas [Athena] who rouses battles and Artemis delighting-in-arrows (iokheaira): we were playing and gathering sweet flowers in our hands, soft crocuses mingled with irises and hyacinths, and rose-blooms and lilies, marvellous to see.’ "

Pausanias, Description of Greece 8. 31. 2 (trans. Jones) (Greek travelogue C2nd A.D.) :
"[Depicted in the temple of Demeter and Persephone at Megalopolis in Arkadia:] before them he made small maids in tunics reaching to the ankles, each of whom carries on her head a basket full of flowers. They are said to be daughters of Damophon, but those inclining to a more religious interpretation hold that they are Athena and Artemis gathering the flowers with Persephone."

Diodorus Siculus, Library of History 5. 2. 3 (trans. Oldfather) (Greek historian C1st B.C.) :
"And both Athene and Artemis, the myth goes on to say, who had made the same choice of maidenhood as had Kore and were reared together with her [on the island of Sicily], joined with her in gathering the flowers, and all of them together wove the robe for their father Zeus. And because of the time they had spent together and their intimacy they all loved this island above any other."

Pseudo-Hyginus, Fabulae 146 (trans. Grant) (Roman mythographer C2nd A.D.) :
"While Proserpina [Persephone] was gathering flowers with Venus [Aphrodite], Diana [Artemis], and Minerva [Athena], Pluto came in his four-horse chariot, and seized her."

Valerius Flaccus, Argonautica 5. 344 ff (trans. Mozley) (Roman epic C1st A.D.) :
"Proserpine [Persephone] in spring-time led the dance over Hymettus' flowery ridges or beneath the cliffs of Sicily, on this side stepping close by Pallas [Athene], on that side hand in hand with her beloved Diana [Artemis], taller than they and surpassing her fellows."

Statius, Thebaid 1. 824 ff (trans. Mozley) (Roman epic C1st A.D.) :
"Beneath the rocks of Aetna in Sicily Diana [Artemis] and bold Pallas [Athene] and the consort of the Elysian monarch [Persephone] shine forth among the Nymphae of Enna."

For MORE information on Persephone's abduction see RAPE OF PERSEPHONE


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: LETO (HER MOTHER)

Homer, Iliad 5. 447 ff (trans. Lattimore) (Greek epic C8th B.C.) :
"Apollon caught [the wounded] Aineias now away from the onslaught, and set him in the sacred keep of Pergamos [in Troy] where was built his own temple. There Artemis of the showering arrows (iokheaira) and Leto within the great and secret chamber healed his wound and cared for him."

Homer, Iliad 21. 470 ff :
"[Hera] caught both of her [Artemis'] arms at the wrists in her left hand then with her own bow, smiling, boxed her ears as Artemis tried to twist away, and the flying arrows were scattered . . .she left her archery on the ground, and fled weeping . . .
Leto picked up the curved bow and the arrows which had fallen in the turn of the dust one way and another. When she had taken up the bow she went back to her daughter."

Hesiod, The Astronomy Fragment 4 (from Pseudo-Eratosthenes, Catast. 32) (trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C8th or 7th B.C.) :
"Orion went away to Krete and spent his time hunting in company with Artemis and Leto."

Statius, Achilleid 1. 344 ff (trans. Mozley) (Roman epic C1st A.D.) :
"When [Artemis] returns wearied to her sire [Zeus] and brother [Apollon on Mt Olympos] from Therapnae, haunt of maidens, her mother [Leto] bears her company as she goes, and with her own hand covers her shoulders and bared arms, herself arranges the bow and quiver, and pulls down the girt-up robe, and is proud to trim the disordered tresses."

For MORE information on this goddess see LETO


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: APOLLON & THE MOUSAI (MUSES)

Homer, Iliad 5. 447 ff (trans. Lattimore) (Greek epic C8th B.C.) :
"Apollon caught [the wounded] Aineias now away from the onslaught, and set him in the sacred keep of Pergamos [in Troy] where was built his own temple. There Artemis of the showering arrows (iokheaira) and Leto within the great and secret chamber healed his wound and cared for him."

Homeric Hymn 3 to Pythian Apollo 190 ff (trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C7th or 6th B.C.) :
"[On Olympos] the Mousai (Muses) together, voice sweetly answering voice, hymn . . . And among them sings . . . Artemis . . . while Apollon plays his lyre stepping high."

Homeric Hymn 27 to Artemis 14 ff :
"[Artemis] goes to the great house of her dear brother Phoibos Apollon, to the rich land of Delphoi, there to order the lovely dance of the Mousai (Muses) and Kharites (Graces). There she hangs up her curved bow and her arrows, and heads and leads the dances, gracefully arrayed, white all they utter their heavenly voice, singing."

Pausanias, Description of Greece 10. 13. 7 (trans. Jones) (Greek travelogue C2nd A.D.) :
"[Depicted on a work of art dedicated at Delphoi:] Herakles and Apollom are holding on to the tripod, and are preparing to fight about it. Leto and Artemis are calming Apollon, and Athena is calming Herakles."

For MORE information on these goddesses see THE MOUSAI


ARTEMIS ATTENDANTS: APOTHEOSED MAIDENS

I) POLYBOIA

For MYTHS of Artemis & Polyboia see Artemis Favour: Polyboia
For MORE information on this demi-goddess see POLYBOIA

II) PHYLONOE

For MYTHS of Artemis & Phylonoe see Artemis Favour: Phylonoe
For MORE information on this Nymphe see PHYLONOE

III) IPHIGENEIA

For MYTHS of Artemis & Iphigeneia see Artemis Favour: Iphigeneia

IV) MAKARIA-EUKLEIA

For the MYTHH of Artemis & Makaria see Artemis Favour: Makaria-Eukleia
For MORE information on this Demi-goddess see EUKLEIA

V) ASPALIS

For the MYTH of Artemis & Aspalis see Artemis Favour: Aspalis

VI) PARTHENOS & HEMITHEA

For MORE information on these demi-goddesses see PARTHENOS & HEMITHEA


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: ANTIKLEIA

Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 184 ff (trans. Mair) (Greek poet C3rd B.C.) :
"What heroines hast thou [Artemis] taken for thy companions? . . . Fair Antikleia [mother of Odysseus], they say, thou dist love even as thine own eyes. . . These [Antikleia and others] were the first who wore the gallant bow and arrow-holding quivers on their shoulders; their right shoulders bore the quiver strap, and always the right breast showed bare."


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: ATALANTA

Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 184 ff (trans. Mair) (Greek poet C3rd B.C.) :
"What heroines hast thou [Artemis] taken for thy companions? . . . Thou dist greatly commend swift-footed Atalanta, the slayer of boars, daughter of Arkadian Iasios, and taught her hunting with dogs and good archery."

Aelian, Historical Miscellany 13. 1 (trans. Wilson) (Greek rhetorician C2nd to 3rd A.D.) :
"Atalante slept on the skins of animals caught in the hunt, she lived on their meat and drank water. She wore simple clothes, in a style that did not fall short of Artemis’ example; she claimed the goddess as her model both in his and in her wish to remain a virgin. She was very fleet of foot, and no wild animal or man with designs on her could have escaped her."


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: KALLISTO

Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 3. 100 (trans. Aldrich) (Greek mythographer C2nd A.D.) :
"She [Kallisto] was a hunting companion of Artemis, imitating her dress and remaining under oath a virgin for the goddess."

Ovid, Metamorphoses 2. 414 ff (trans. Melville) (Roman epic C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.) :
"[Kallisto] a country Nympha of Nonacris . . . was no girl to spin soft skeins of wool or vary her hair-style; a buckle held her dress, a plain white band her strangling hair. She carried a light spear - sometimes a bow - Phoebe's [Artemis'] warrior; none so high as she in Trivia's [Artemis'] favour on the mountain slopes of Maenalus; but favourites soon fall."

Ovid, Fasti 2. 155 ff (trans.Boyle) (Roman poetry C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.) :
"Callisto once belonged to the sacred circle of Hamadryades and huntress Diana [Artemis]. She touched the goddess' bow: ‘this bow I touch,’ she cried, ‘Be a witness to my virginity.’ Cynthia [Artemis] praised her, and said: ‘Keep the pledge you vowed and you will be my companions’ princeps.’ She would have kept the pledge but for her prettiness."

For MYTHS of Artemis and Kallisto see Artemis Wrath: Kallisto


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: KYRENE

Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 184 ff (trans. Mair) (Greek poet C3rd B.C.) :
"What heroines hast thou [Artemis] taken for thy companions? . . . Kyrene thou madest thy comrade, to whom on a time thyself didst give two hunting dogs, with whom the maiden daughter of Hypseus beside the Iolkian tomb won the prize . . . These [Kyrene and others] were the first who wore the gallant bow and arrow-holding quivers on their shoulders; their right shoulders bore the quiver strap, and always the right breast showed bare."

For MORE information on this Nymphe see KYRENE


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: PHYLONOME

Pseudo-Plutarch, Greek and Roman Parallel Stories 36 (trans. Babbitt) (Greek historian C2nd A.D.) :
"Phylonome, the daughter of Nyktimos and Arkadia, was wont to hunt with Artemis; but Ares, in the guise of a shepherd, got her with child . . . So says Zopyros of Byzantium in the third book of his Histories."


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: PROKRIS

Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 184 ff (trans. Mair) (Greek poet C3rd B.C.) :
"What heroines hast thou [Artemis] taken for thy companions? . . . The fair-haired [Prokris] wife of Kephalos, son of Deioneus, O Lady, thou madest thy fellow in the chase . . . These [Prokris and others] were the first who wore the gallant bow and arrow-holding quivers on their shoulders; their right shoulders bore the quiver strap, and always the right breast showed bare."

Pseudo-Hyginus, Fabulae 189 (trans. Grant) (Roman mythographer C2nd A.D.) :
"Procris fled to the island of Krete [after discovering her husband was unfaithful], where Diana [Artemis] used to hunt. When Diana [Artemis] saw her, she said to her: ‘virgins hunt with me, but you are not a virgin, leave my company.’ "

For the MYTH of Artemis & Prokris see Artemis Favour: Prokris


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: HIPPOLYTOS

Pausanias, Description of Greece 2. 27. 4 (trans. Jones) (Greek travelogue C2nd A.D.) :
"When Hippolytos was killed . . . Asklepios raised him from the dead. On coming to life again he refused to forgive his father rejecting his prayers, he went to the Arikians in Italia. There he became king and devoted a precinct to Artemis."

Ovid, Fasti 6. 735 ff (trans.Boyle) (Roman poetry C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.) :
"The youth [Hippolytos] raised his drooping head from the ground [after Artemis persuaded Asklepios to bring him back to life]. The grove and recesses of Dictynna's [Artemis'] wood hide him: he is Virbius of Aricia’s lake."

For MYTHS of Artemis & Hippolytos see Artemis Favour: Hippolytos


ARTEMIS COMPANIONS: ORION

Hesiod, The Astronomy Fragment 4 (from Pseudo-Eratosthenes, Catast. 32)(trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C8th or 7th B.C.) :
"Orion went away to Crete and spent his time hunting in company with Artemis and Leto."

Ovid, Fasti 5. 493 ff (trans.Boyle) (Roman poetry C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.) :
"Delia [Artemis] made him [Orion] her companion; he guarded the goddess and he served her."

For MYTHS of Artemis & Orion see Artemis Favour: Orion & Wrath: Orion


Sources:

  • Homer, The Iliad - Greek Epic C9th-8th BC
  • Homer, The Odyssey - Greek Epic C9th-8th BC
  • Hesiod, Astronomy - Greek Epic C8th-7th BC
  • The Homeric Hymns - Greek Epic C8th-4th BC
  • Pindar, Odes - Greek Lyric C5th BC
  • Apollodorus, The Library - Greek Mythography C2nd BC
  • Apollonius Rhodius, The Argonautica - Greek Epic C3rd BC
  • Callimachus, Hymns - Greek C3rd BC
  • Herodotus, Histories - Greek History C5th BC
  • Pausanias, Guide to Greece - Greek Geography C2nd AD
  • Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History - Greek History C1st BC
  • Plutarch, Parallel Stories - Greek Historian C1st-2nd AD
  • Aelian, Historical Miscellany - Greek Rhetoric C2nd-3rd A.D.
  • Hyginus, Fabulae - Latin Mythography C2nd AD
  • Ovid, Metamorphoses - Latin Epic C1st BC - C1st AD
  • Ovid, Fasti - Latin Epic C1st BC - C1st AD
  • Statius, Achilleid - Latin Epic C1st AD
  • Statius, Silvae - Latin Epic C1st AD
  • Nonnos, Dionysiaca - Greek Epic C5th AD